Programming Language Courses Online

Live Instructor Led Online Training Programming Language courses is delivered using an interactive remote desktop! .

During the course each participant will be able to perform Programming Language exercises on their remote desktop provided by Qwikcourse.


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Programming Language Training


Ada Programming

About

This is the first Ada tutorial covering the Ada 2005 and 2012 standards. If you are a beginner you will learn the latest standard — if you are a seasoned Ada user you can see what's new. Current Development Stage for Ada Programming is " (Feb 26, 2012)". At this date, there are more than 200 pages in this course, which makes Ada Programming one of the largest programming wikibooks. Ada is a programming language suitable for all development needs. It has built-in features that directly support structured, object-oriented, generic, distributed and concurrent programming. Ada is a good choice for Rapid Application Development, Extreme Programming (XP), and Free Software development. Ada is named after Augusta Ada King-Noel, Countess of Lovelace.


7 hours

1,656 €

Data Mining Algorithms In R

About

In general terms, Data Mining comprises techniques and algorithms for determining interesting patterns from large datasets. There are currently hundreds of algorithms that perform tasks such as frequent pattern mining, clustering, and classification, among others. Understanding how these algorithms work and how to use them effectively is a continuous challenge faced by data mining analysts, researchers, and practitioners, in particular because the algorithm behavior and patterns it provides may change significantly as a function of its parameters. In practice, most of the data mining literature is too abstract regarding the actual use of the algorithms and parameter tuning is usually a frustrating task. On the other hand, there is a large number of implementations available, such as those in the R project, but their documentation focus mainly on implementation details without providing a good discussion about parameter-related trade-offs associated with each of them. This course aims to fill this gap by integrating three pieces of information for each technique: description and rationale, implementation details, and use cases. The description and rationale of each technique provide the necessary background for understanding the implementation and applying it to real scenarios. The implementation details not only expose the algorithm design, but also explain its parameters in the light of the rationale provided previously. Finally, the use cases provide an experience of the algorithms use on synthetic and real datasets. The choice of the R project as the computational platform associated with This course stems from its popularity (and thus critical mass), ease of programming, good performance, and an increasing use in several fields, such as bioinformatics and finance.

7 hours

1,656 €

Lua Programming

About

Lua (not "LUA", which is incorrect although common) is a powerful, fast, lightweight and embeddable programming language. It is used by many frameworks, games and other applications. While it can be used by itself, it has been designed to be easy to embed in another application. It is implemented in ANSI C, a subset of the C programming language that is very portable, which means it can run on many systems and many devices where most other scripting languages would not be able to run. The purpose of This course is to teach Lua programming to anyone regardless of previous programming experience. the course can be used as an introduction to programming, for someone who has never programmed before, or as an introduction to Lua, for people who have programmed before but not in Lua. Since there are many development platforms and games that use Lua, This course can also be used to learn to use Lua and then to use it in that development platform. This course aims to teach usage of the latest version of Lua. This means it will be attempted to regularly update it as new versions of Lua come out (Lua releases are infrequent enough that this should not be too difficult). Currently, the course is up-to-date for Lua 5.2, which is the previous version. If you are using Lua in an embedded environment that uses an older version of Lua in the 5.x branch (Lua 5.0 and Lua 5.1), the material should still be sufficiently relevant for you. This course is divided into the following chapters and appendices:

7 hours

1,656 €

XML - Managing Data Exchange

About

eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is a widely used computer language for creating and designing pages on the World Wide Web, and for defining other languages with more specialized purposes. This course provides a detailed description of XML, its origins, its programming, and its uses on the Internet today. This course also provides exercises with which to test the knowledge you have gained through the deliberate study of its contents. If you wish to participate in the writing or editing of XML - Managing Data Exchange, or if you have an idea as to how This course can be improved, please see the "to-do" list. You may also add your name to the list of contributors. Preface

7 hours

1,656 €

Haskell

About

Haskell is a functional programming language. It is distinct in a few ways: Haskell is enjoyable to use because dealing with pure functions makes code much easier to reason about, and the advanced type system helps catch silly and profound mistakes. Our aim in This course is to introduce you to the Haskell programming language — from the very basics to advanced features — and to computer programming in general. We urge seasoned programmers to be especially patient with this process. The languages you are familiar with are likely to differ greatly from Haskell, and the habits acquired from those languages might make it difficult to understand how things work — Haskell is simple, but different. Learning to see the world through the warped mindset of a functional programmer is an adventure in a brave new world, which brings knowledge valuable far beyond the boundaries of any language. the course is divided into three sections: a Beginner's Track, an Advanced Track, and a section called Haskell in Practice. The last section, which covers practical use cases, depends only on the Beginner's Track. Seasoned programmers may read the overview to quickly evaluate what makes Haskell unique and different from other languages. You may search the course here:

7 hours

1,656 €

Introduction to newLISP

About

Welcome to this introduction to newLISP! You'll find newLISP easy to learn and powerful, combining some of the power and elegance of classic LISP with the facilities of a modern scripting language, such as regular expressions, network functions, Unicode support, multitasking, and many others. This course is a straightforward and simple description of the basics of the language. You should be familiar with using a text editor, and ideally you'll have done a bit of scripting before, but previous programming experience or knowledge of LISP isn't required. I hope it's enough to get you started, and ready to start exploring the real power of newLISP. I'm writing this on a MacOS X system, but it shouldn't make any difference if you're using Linux, Windows, or one of the many other platforms that newLISP supports. The examples are designed to be run in newLISP version 10. This is an unofficial document—for the official and definitive description of newLISP refer to the excellent reference manual that is installed with the software. Thanks to everyone who has contributed to earlier versions of this document, by suggesting additions or finding errors. Keep them coming.

7 hours

1,656 €

Java Web Application Development With Click Framework

About

Click Framework is a modern JEE web application framework, providing a natural rich client style programming model. Click is designed to be very easy to learn and use, with developers getting up and running within a day. The design philosophy behind Click is best summarized in the Swedish word lagom which translates to not too little or too much, but optimal. If you want to dive straight into some code examples see the Introduction. Otherwise if you want to know why anyone would want to build another web application framework read Why Click? The Click project has been lead by Malcolm Edgar, and has included contributing developers Phil Barnes, Ahmed Mohombe, Naoki Takezoe, Christian Essl, Stephen Haberman and Bob Schellink. Click is hosted by SourceForge.net.

7 hours

1,656 €

Programming Mac OS X with Cocoa for Beginners

About

This course aims to provide beginners with an introduction to programming Mac OS X Apps with Cocoa, using XCode, the free developer tools provided by Apple, Inc. Some knowledge of another programming language, preferably Objective C Programming is assumed. This course was written for users of Mac OS X 10.3 or 10.4, it should also work for newer versions of Mac OS X such as 10.5 and 10.6. For programming Mac OS X with Cocoa for Beginners using Mac OS X versions 10.7 "Lion", or 10.8 "Mountain Lion" or later, use the following wikibook instead: Programming Mac OS X with Cocoa for Beginners 2nd Edition It is suggested that you upgrade to 10.8, "Mountain Lion" because it is better supported by Apple. In general, this text is written to be followed in order from start to finish. As each topic develops, it builds on the code written previously to add complexity and functionality.

7 hours

1,656 €

QBasic

About

Microsoft QuickBasic and QBasic (Quick Beginners All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) are very popular programming languages for beginners. While its lack of power makes it unsuitable for many of today's applications, it is an invaluable learning tool. This course will cover the usage of QBasic and most of its functions. While most of the text discussed will work under QBasic, that version of the Basic interpreter has limitations and certain advanced commands will only work under QuickBasic. One of the best Qbasic IDEs (Integrated Development Environment) is QB64. There are certain functions that work only in QB64. View This course in full book view. Authors

7 hours

1,656 €

Rebol Programming

About

This course covers the basics of Rebol programming, what Rebol actually does and why it's designed the way it is. It's not a reference manual and therefore doesn't contain a complete overview of all functions, but aims to teach the mechanics and principles of the language to give you a deeper understanding of it. This is a wikibook, as such you should learn a bit about what it is and how it does its magic. the course is (or will be) organized into different parts (chapters), but as this is a work that is always evolving, things may be missing or just not where they should be, you are free to become a writer and contribute to fix things up. All Rebol developers who have interesting information are encouraged to come forward. It does not matter if you are not a stellar writer, as eventually it will be cleaned up. Although you can post to This course without registering, it is strongly advised that you do so so that we can discuss content which may be contentious. It is advised at this point to try and keep meanings within the realm of common understanding by the REBOL community. Anything outside that realm should be stated as such.

7 hours

1,656 €

XForms

About

XForms is a World Wide Web Consortium recommendation for creating web forms and web applications. It's easy to learn, provides a rich user experience and does not require you to learn JavaScript. There are many different implementations of XForms and this cookbook is designed to work with any of them. A list of implementations is available on the W3C website. This is a collaborative project and we encourage everyone who is using XForms to contribute their complete working XForms examples. All submissions must be licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 license. Note: many of the examples in This course still use the "nodeset" attribute for binding rules, groups and repeats. Most XForms systems (Orbeon and betterForm) now use the "ref" attribute and may no longer support the older "nodeset" attributes. XSLTForms 1.0RC does not allow @ref instead of @nodeset but builds since rev.559 do support @ref where @nodeset was previously used. We will be updating the examples accordingly. If you feel these examples are useful please create links to this site. This course has over 30 contributors.

7 hours

1,656 €

ACE+TAO Opensource Programming Notes

About

This course addresses issues related to TAO CORBA development and integration. First, a word or two about the nature of open source projects. The main benefit of an open source project is that you get a working product you can use, complete with community support. This support often takes the form of user's support as well as developer support. Ideally, these support avenues also include documentation. Should the open source project in question lack some of the pieces mentioned above, its utility as an open source product (particularly as the product becomes more complex) is necessarily diminished. ACE+TAO is a wonderful product which compares well to other open source products like Orbit or Mico. It encompasses much of the current standard and comes complete with all the services you would expect (and some extras too). Unfortunately, except for the most basic services (the naming service) there are precious few documented programming examples in their tutorial. While there are several source files in the examples directory, these are sadly not written with documented code (often without even a header describing the use for the example), and certainly not included in any web page explaining their code or use. Object Computing, Inc. freely provides the Getting Started chapter of their TAO Developer's Guide (that can be purchased for around $20.00). This chapter is complete with code examples and walks the user through the steps needed to make a simple TAO client and server. The open-source TAO 1.4a distribution contains all examples referenced in the TAO Developer's Guide, while the FAQ contains some helpful information for beginners and experts alike.

7 hours

1,656 €

Game Maker Programming

About

Welcome to the Game Maker Programming tutorial at Wikibooks. Game Maker by Mark Overmars, which we deal with in these tutorials is not to be confused with GameMaker or The 3D Game Maker. Some of the chapters may be written using an older Game Maker version, so if the GUI does not look identical to your own, don't worry, these tutorials are all compatible with version 9. Game Maker is a game development software application written by Mark Overmars in the Delphi programming language. It is designed to allow its users to easily develop computer games without having to learn a complex programming language such as C++ or Pascal. For experienced users, Game Maker contains a built-in scripting programming language called "GML", or "Game Maker Language". Games can be distributed either free, or for profit, as ".gmk", ".gm6", or ".gmd" source files, or as standalone ".exe", ".jar", or ".html" files. To extend the Drag and Drop functionality of Game Maker, you can use files called Libraries to add new drag and drop items to the lists. These can be created by members with a special library builder, only available via the Game Maker Community, which has over 100,000 members. Game Maker is not as widely known or as used as other game development programs, such as the RPG School (RPG maker) series for Role-playing games. It has, however, attracted a substantial number of users; mainly because of the program's accessibility to beginners while still allowing complex tasks to be undertaken by more advanced users. It is not as narrow in game creation as other programs, as it allows the creation of many types of games, including platform games, first-person shooters, third-person shooters, multiplayer online games, simulation games, programs, and more.

7 hours

1,656 €

Parrot Virtual Machine

About

The Parrot Virtual Machine is a runtime engine for use with dynamic programming languages such as Perl, Python, Ruby and PHP. While originally designed for use with version 6 of the Perl programming language, it has expanded to a general-purpose dynamic virtual machine to host multiple high-level languages. Parrot has been designed, in part, for ease of use by programmers and language designers. A series of tools called the Parrot Compiler Tools (PCT) have been designed that facilitate the creation of new languages for Parrot. These tools aide in creating new dynamic programming languages or implementing old languages on Parrot. This course is going to introduce the reader to the Parrot Virtual Machine and the Parrot programming environment. We will discuss the creation of programs in the PIR and PASM languages and we will also discuss how to create new languages that compile to the Parrot platform. We will also talk about Parrot itself, and introduce the reader to Parrot's internals, which are released under an open source license and can be modified by able volunteers.

7 hours

1,656 €

Swift Introduction

About

This course is an introduction to Swift. Basic concepts like datatypes, variables and collection types are described in the second chapter. Advanced features like closures, properties and error handling are the topic of the third chapter. The concepts presented in This course are explained in short texts on the one hand and various code examples on the other hand. Therefore, This course helps the reader to quickly understand the described concepts. This course aims at people who are interested in iOS development and do not have any previous experience with Objective-C. All code examples can be found in this GitHub repository.

7 hours

1,656 €

A Brief Introduction to the LaTeX Typesetting Environment

About

This course is to give a person who has never used the LaTeX environment before a crash-course in how to create a simple document quickly. We will not go into the details of more complicated things LaTeX can do, but instead will focus on the use of templates and the basic principles of what is going on behind the scenes. Ideally a beginner will be able to read the first few chapters and produce a document in the course of a few hours, then being proficient in the language henceforth. This course is also intended as a general reference to the simpler functions, declarations, and predefined control-sequences used in the LaTeX environment. Appendices will offer the reader an easy, logically ordered way of looking up the commands they want to find with examples where relevant. Using a project like Wikipedia or Wikibooks as the platform for a novel introduces the opportunity for a lot of new and wonderful concepts. First of all the course is a living one, there's no need to go buy a new edition if something changes or if typos are found and corrected, they'll be available online immediately. The most useful feature, in the author's humbler opinion, is the ability to add live references to literally every word of the document. While that won't be the case in this course, there will be references where necessary. The further reading section has links to more in-depth texts available online while certain keywords or concepts may link to their respective webpages or articles about them. At the same time, to add to the validity of each entry, references will be made and rather than looking them up yourself as in a normal, printed book, one can simply click the link and be taken to the reference.

 


7 hours

1,656 €

Authoring Webpages

About

The World Wide Web (often simply called "the Web") is a means of communication using inter-linked pages of text called "web pages". A coherent group of such pages is called a "website". This short course will attempt to provide a hands-on approach to teach you how to make high-quality web pages. After a short introduction, you will be thrown in at the deep end and start making web pages yourself. Many courses approach the creation of webpages and websites as a computing task. Many others approach it as a graphical design challenge. Both approaches are rooted in treating the web as if it were a computational or graphical medium. Rooting the web in a understandable metaphor may be comforting, it is also misleading. The web is a new medium, that requires a completely new approach to building parts of it. Although students will often pick up some of the right concepts while studying the 'programming' and 'designing' books, it is often better to start with the right concepts, and deal with the computational and graphical aspects of the web later. What this course therefore tries to accomplish, is providing the student with a strong basis for learning more about building webpages. This course will try and do this in a practical, hands-on way. Almost from the get-go, students will start authoring their own webpages.

7 hours

1,656 €

BASIC Programming

About

BASIC was developed in 1963 at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire as a teaching language. The acronym BASIC stands for Beginner's All-Purpose Symbolic Instruction Code. In 1964, John G. Kemeny and Thomas E. Kurtz designed the original BASIC language at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. Anybody can write a program. A background in mathematics or science is not required. Patience, practice, and an interest in the subject matter should suffice, along with the required software and hardware. Understanding programs can appear daunting at first, but their reliance on logical operations allow for easy learning of commands which you will commonly see in many programs. A program itself is merely a series of commands in the order in which they are to be executed. That is to say, that the first line is the beginning of the program! All programs a user uses from day to day, including browsers (Internet Explorer, Firefox, etc.) and operating systems (Windows, Linux and Mac OS, etc) are separate sets of lines of code, which aim to fulfill tasks. the amount of code is dependent on how simple the task generally, and different types of code may be used for the advantages they give. BASIC is considered an excellent starting point for moving onto other languages, and can be useful for simple programs.

7 hours

1,656 €

Clojure Programming

About

Clojure is a dynamic programming language for the JVM. People come to Clojure from a variety of backgrounds. The purpose of This course is to help everyone get the most out of the Clojure language. It is not meant as a replacement for the documentation, found at the Clojure site. Please do not copy material from there to here! Feel free to post your own code, written in the Clojure language, here. However, please do not post excerpts, patches or other modifications or derivations of the Clojure source itself, as the license of this Wiki is incompatible with the Clojure license. Instead, post such things to the Clojure discussion group. There are a number of different implementations of the Clojure language: Some answers to Frequently Asked Questions. The Getting started section covers obtaining and installing Clojure as well as basic setup of editors such as Emacs or Vim.

7 hours

1,656 €

Octave Programming Tutorial

About

The purpose of this course is to get you through most (and eventually all) of the available Octave functionality from a basic level. A longer and more advanced Wikibook related to Octave Programming is the MATLAB Programming Wikibook. Those familiar with MATLAB that want to jump into Octave should consult MATLAB Programming/Differences between Octave and MATLAB. Indeed, Octave is often viewed as a system for numerical computations with a language that is mostly compatible with Matlab, but that is available as free software under the GNU GPL, and that can replace it in many circumstances.


21 hours

4,968 €

OpenGL Programming

About

Welcome to the OpenGL Programming course. OpenGL is an API used for drawing 3D graphics. OpenGL is not a programming language; an OpenGL application is typically written in C or C++. What OpenGL does allow you to do is draw attractive, realistic 3D graphics with minimal effort. The API is typically used to interact with a GPU, to achieve hardware-accelerated rendering. You are free, and encouraged, to share and contribute to This course: it is written in the spirit of free documentation, that belongs to humanity. Feel free to make copies, teach it in school or professional classes, improve the text, write comments or even new sections. We're looking for contributors. If you know about OpenGL, feel free to leave comments, expand TODO sections and write new ones! "Modern" OpenGL is about OpenGL 2.1+, OpenGL ES 2.0+ and WebGL, with a programmable pipeline and shaders. Tutorial_drafts: ideas and notes for upcoming tutorials

7 hours

1,656 €

Ruby Programming

About

Ruby is an interpreted, object-oriented programming language. Its creator, Yukihiro Matsumoto, a.k.a “Matz”, released it to the public in 1995. Its history is covered here. Its many features are listed here. the course is currently broken down into several sections and is intended to be read sequentially. Getting started will show how to install and get started with Ruby in your environment. Basic Ruby demonstrates the main features of the language syntax. The Ruby language section is organized like a reference to the language. Available modules covers some of the standard library. Intermediate Ruby covers a selection of slightly more advanced topics. Each section is designed to be self contained. See also some rdoc documentation on the various keywords. This is a list of classes that are available to you by default in Ruby. They are pre-defined in “core.” These are parts of Ruby that you have available (in the standard library, or via installation as a gem). To use them you typically have to require some filename, for example require 'tracer' would make accessible to you the Tracer class.

7 hours

1,656 €

TI-Basic Z80 Programming

About

This course covers the Z80 processor's version of TI-BASIC. TI-BASIC is a simple programming language used on Texas Instruments (TI) graphing calculators. The language is quite simple, and integrates many normal graphing calculator commands (such as storing variables or graphing) into its code. TI-BASIC is very easy to program, especially when compared to assembly, which is the other main language that can be used to program TI graphing calculators. Also, programs written in TI-BASIC can have small file sizes, since common functions can be programmed with just one character (1-2 bytes), such as If or Menu(. However, this makes execution of TI-BASIC programs very slow, since each line of code must be read and parsed before execution. Despite the crawling speed of TI-BASIC, it's appropriate for many simple programs. There are two main versions of TI-BASIC in use today: Please note that within these two versions of TI-BASIC, there are slight variations. This table of contents arranges the sections in the best order possible for those who are trying to learn the language. However, if you are already familiar with TI-BASIC, you may decide to skip certain sections.

7 hours

1,656 €

Wiki-based archival description and storage

About

This course is a practical manual for organizations and individuals who have archives that they need to arrange, describe, digitize, and store — and who wish part of these archives to be part of "the sum of all knowledge" in the Wikimedia movement. It explains a system of safe, permanent storage for archival items that encompasses everything from initial accessioning and evaluation; through arrangement, description, and digitization (or digital conversion for digitally-created items); to techniques of shelving, boxing, and conservation. It includes details of how to manage collaborative (crowd-sourced) transcriptions on Wikisource, and the integration of knowledge from the archives into Wikipedia articles. If you are using the guidelines in This course to manage your archives, we invite you to also edit these pages as you learn what works and what doesn't, in order to share your knowledge with the rest of the community. You may also like to share your specific experiences by creating learning resources on Wikiversity. What do we mean by 'wiki-based'? Simply that the system described here makes use of the network of wiki sites operated by the Wikimedia movement, as well as the MediaWiki software that these sites run on. Being wiki-based in this way implies a few characteristics of an archival management system: it is web-based and spread across a number of different web sites; many people can contribute to it, and all their contributions are visible to each other and traceable; and that the supporting software is not as prescriptive of how the system works as is the case with a traditional archival database.

7 hours

1,656 €

WikiSkills Handbook

About

This course is meant to be a practical guide to help educators of all type (teachers, trainers) bring their public in using wikis and wiki-like tools for their learning activities, through the use of customized wiki-based learning scenarios, for their socio-professional development. The handbook has been developed in the context of the WikiSkills European project, which aims to apply the benefits of wikis to promote educational lifelong learning opportunities. It has been further refined during the Wikinomics European Project, meant to improve, reuse and disseminate Wikiskills results, with a focus on the area of economy and employment This course is structured in several parts. The last part of the course is a toolkit of useful resources, i.e. the technical environment proposed within the WikiSkills project, links and readings of interest for readers aiming to get a deeper understanding of the use of wikis in education, guidelines for teachers, educational videos, key competencies table, collaborative badges, and a FAQ. The FAQ addresses questions that end-users may have depending on his/her daily context. The FAQ aims at answering on the how-to’s and also at removing fears and obstacles that users may have when they are in situation of managing change for/via wiki solutions within their organization, network or daily life. it intends to provide resources for trainers to offer to the consideration of the final trainer when facing his students.

7 hours

1,656 €

x86 Assembly

About

This course covers assembly language programming for the x86 family of microprocessors. The objective is to teach how to program in x86 assembly, as well as the history and basic architecture of x86 processor family. When referring to x86 we address the complete range of x86-based processors (since the original Intel 8086 in 1978). This includes: Throughout the course these terms may be used interchangeably when appropriate. A special notice will be given when covering 16-bit, 32-bit or 64-bit architectures and on any limitations to limit confusion.

7 hours

1,656 €

XQuery

About

Welcome to the XQuery Examples Collection Wikibook! XQuery is a World Wide Web Consortium recommendation for selecting data from documents and databases. There is a Github project to track issues with This course and collaborate amongst eXist db folk at least to bring this resource up-to-date. Main tasks in the current refurbishment are to: Recent Changes You may search the course here: This is a collaborative project and we encourage everyone who is using XQuery to contribute their XQuery examples. All example programs must conform to the creative-commons-2.5 share-alike with attribution license agreement [1]. Execution of examples use an eXist demo server. Common tasks in using XQuery with XML

7 hours

1,656 €

Coding

About

This course features all kinds of short coding samples, often called code snippets. It is not a reference for any specific coding language, or a command reference. Like an ordinary cookbook, you are not looking for a recipe that can be made from a certain ingredient or using a certain utensil, but you are looking to perform a specific task. Often, these snippets are multi-disciplinary. Especially with web programming languages, you often use a combination of HTML, CSS, JavaScript and possibly server-side languages to perform a certain task. Also, the same result can often be achieved using different languages. Each task can list solutions in several languages. By Task - By Language - Alphabetic listing

7 hours

1,656 €

Message-Passing Interface

About

This course assumes you have previous knowledge about C programming and will present you Message-Passing Interface (MPI) by several examples. MPI is a standardized and portable message-passing system. Message-passing systems are used especially on distributed machines with separate memory for executing parallel applications. With this system, each executing process will communicate and share its data with others by sending and receiving messages. MPI is the specification resulting from the MPI-Forum which involved several organizations designing a portable system (that can allow programs to work on a heterogeneous network). Since the data can only be shared by exchanging messages, this standard is not intended for use on shared-memory systems, like a multiprocessor computer (although it will work, it is not the primary goal and there are more powerful alternatives, for instance, OpenMP). Basically, MPI includes point-to-point communication, collective communication (over a network of processes), process groups, bindings for Fortran and C and other advanced functions. On the other hand, the standard does not specify explicit shared-memory operations, debugging facilities, explicit support for threads, I/O functions. The current version is 2.0, although 1.1 is still used.

7 hours

1,656 €

X Window Programming

About

This course describes how to program the X Window System, a server application for Unix-like operating systems that lays ground for displaying graphics and gathering user input. the course assumes some basic knowledge on how to use a computer, how to set up and use The X Window System, how to use a compiler, and how to write a program in the C programming language.

7 hours

1,656 €

360 Assembly

About

This course is about assembly language programming for the Fujitsu BS2000 Mainframe and the IBM 360, 370, ESA/390, 93xx and z/System family of mainframe computers. The same assembly language was also used on the Univac 90/60, 90/70, and 90/80 mainframes. The machines generally provided upward compatibility for user programs (a program such as a payroll program written for MVS on a 24-bit 360 in the 1960 or early 1970s, will run unmodified on 31-bit VS/1 in the 1980s. While a later program (say an accounts payable application) written for 31-bit VS/1 in the 1980s wouldn't run on a 360 if it used 31-bit operations, both programs will run unmodified under z/OS on a 64-bit z/System in 2015.) The term "360" will be used to refer to an instruction which works on all of these models, while the other designations - System/370, S/370, 370; ESA/390, 390; z/System, Z - will be used to refer to features available only in later models of this processor type. This course will attempt to teach how to program in 360 assembly, the history of the processor family, and the basic architecture of 360 and later processor systems.

7 hours

1,656 €

6502 Assembly

About

This course is a guide to the 6502 Assembly language. This course will teach the different memory addressing modes and instructions of the 8-bit 6502 processor. You might want to learn 6502 assembly language programming if you want to do Atari 2600/8-bit family/5200/7800 Programming, Commodore PET/VIC/64/128 Programming, Acorn 8 Bit Programming, Apple I/II Programming, NES Programming or Super NES Programming. Syntax will vary between assemblers - This course will use the following syntax throughout: 16-bit values are stored in memory in little-endian, so the least significant byte is stored before the most significant. E.g. if address $0000 contains $FF and address $0001 contains $00, reading a two-byte value from $0000 will result in $00FF. Signed integers are in two's complement and can represent values from -128 (%11111111) to +127 (%01111111). Bit 7 is set if the integer is negative. The 6502's program counter is 16 bits wide, so up to 2^16 (65536) bytes of memory are addressable. Certain regions of memory are reserved for particular purposes:

7 hours

1,656 €

A Beginner's Guide to D

About

D is very similar to languages like C++ and Java. Therefore, if you have experience with those languages, you can probably pick up D by simply reading the D Transition Guide. This course will be a guide to people starting to program using the D programming language. It is intended for a range of audiences, from people new to programming to the seasoned programmer. the course has been arranged so that you can follow the suggested chapter order, which will lead you through the concepts such that you can use them before finishing the course. Alternatively, you can select the chapters as you see fit, skipping over some things that you might already be familiar with. This course does not include a comprehensive introduction to programming as there are many sources for that already, though it does have a refresher on the topic. The content of This course is based on the use of the Phobos standard library which comes with the DigitalMars dmd compiler. Before contributing, please read the Style Guide.

7 hours

1,656 €

AWK

About

This course is for a semi-knowledgeable UNIX user who has just come up against a problem and has been advised to use awk to solve it. There are the following major versions of awk: Both nawk and gawk will run awk programs without modification. Getting AWK: If you are on Linux or macOS, you already have AWK. For MS Windows, a version of GNU awk is available from ezwinports, GnuWin32 project, and Cygwin. Awk reads from a file or from its standard input, and outputs to its standard output. You will generally want to redirect that into a file, but that is not done in these examples just because it takes up space. awk does not get along with non-text files, like executables and FrameMaker files. If you need to edit those, use a binary editor like hexl-mode in emacs. A frustrating thing about trying to learn awk is getting your program past the shell's parser. The proper way is to use single quotes around the program, like so:

7 hours

1,656 €

Bash Shell Scripting

About

Currently this course provides an introductory level knowledge of Bash. Go to External Programs, External links and Using man, info and help for further directions and inspirations. Bash is a "Unix shell": a command line interface for interacting with the operating system. It is widely available, being the default shell on many GNU/Linux distributions and on Mac OSX, with ports existing for many other systems. It was created in the late 1980s by a programmer named Brian Fox, working for the Free Software Foundation. It was intended as a free software alternative to the Bourne shell (in fact, its name is an acronym for Bourne Again SHell), and it incorporates all features of that shell, as well as new features such as integer arithmetic and job control[1]. In addition to the interactive mode, where the user types one command at a time, with immediate execution and feedback, Bash (like many other shells) also has the ability to run an entire script of commands, known as a "Bash shell script" (or "Bash script" or "shell script" or just "script"). A script might contain just a very simple list of commands — or even just a single command — or it might contain functions, loops, conditional constructs, and all the other hallmarks of imperative programming. In effect, a Bash shell script is a computer program written in the Bash programming language. Shell scripting is the art of creating and maintaining such scripts.

7 hours

1,656 €

C Shell Scripting

About

C shell is a Unix shell created in 1979 by Bill Joy soon after the Bourne shell was released in 1977. Although the latter went on to be the standard shell for Unix, C shell is still popular in BSD distributions. C shell's scripting syntax is modeled after the C language in some aspects. Small programs can be created by writing scripts using the C shell syntax. The Bourne shell is also an option to create Unix scripts but if you are reading This course you probably decided the C shell fits your requirements better. Deciding to use a Unix script at all means that the requirements of the program are rather simple, such as automating the usage of either standard or custom Unix tools. Complex logic or speed sensitive functions should be written in a more appropriate language as custom tools. Nowadays, tcsh, a compatible descendant of C shell, is more commonly used. This course will cover both versions. This section is about learning basic C shell to create small useful scripts. Useful for programmers of any level.

7 hours

1,656 €

CCAPS

About

CCAPS, or Carefully-Controlled Alternative PHP Syntax, is a web template system alternative to template engines such as Smarty and CakePHP. CCAPS, pronounced Cee-Caps, is what PHP web developers can use to separate XHTML source from programming logic, yet glue the two together nicely without introducing spaghetti code. Many developers prefer it to engines such as Smarty because: PHP already has an Alternative PHP Syntax, but what CCAPS does are the following guidelines: ...whereas the Display method automatically assumes vMain.php is in a subfolder called "views". ...which would cause the word 'ERRORMSG' to appear on the page. The fix is this: Most PHP installations already support CCAPS and do not require additional libraries to be installed.

7 hours

1,656 €

Cocoa Programming

About

If you are a beginner, please consider Programming Mac OS X with Cocoa for Beginners Cocoa is the name Apple Computer uses for their extended implementation of the OpenStep specification, first created by NeXT for their OPENSTEP operating system. It provides a useful set of tools to help developers create programs and user interfaces within Mac OS X. There are three implementations of the OpenStep specification, the one originally provided with the OPENSTEP operating system, but the most common ones today are the one provided by Apple, and the other by GNUstep, a free software implementation of OpenStep. If you don't have access to an Apple Macintosh, and you would like to learn how to use the OPENSTEP frameworks, then running GNUstep is worth a consideration (and should be sufficient to let you experience the power of the OPENSTEP frameworks). If you are using an Apple Macintosh computer running Mac OS 10.2 or later (the latest version of Mac OS X is recommended) then you can find all the tools needed to develop Cocoa programs on the last software install CD. The tools are also available from Apple's Developer's Website. In order to download them, you need to create a free account and login. You can also find them in the "Installers" folder of your "Applications" folder (they could be outdated, make sure you run software update after the installation). The two programs you will use most extensively are Xcode (known as Project Builder in versions before 10.3) and Interface Builder.

7 hours

1,656 €

ColdFusion Programming

About

ColdFusion is a JVM-based programming language that supports scripting and templating and was developed by J.J. Allaire in 1995 to make development of CGI scripts easier and faster. It has matured over the years to include many interfaces with other languages and environments. Timeline: n language. ColdFusion servers prior to version 6.0 were written in C++. Since version 6.0, the ColdFusion application server is a Java application sitting on top of the Java Platform. When a page is first called, the ColdFusion code is converted into Java bytecode; this allows better integration with the Java platform and also allows JSP "Java server pages" to be called and run from within a ColdFusion application. Beginning in version 7 there was a dramatic focus on RIA (Rich Internet Applications). The ability to include flash forms, xhtml forms, dynamically created pdfs and flashpaper were all included. Version 8, released in mid 2007, showed dramatic performance improvements, and extended the language functionality to include image processing, presentations, MS Exchange integration, support for .Net components, PDF Form manipulation, Ajax form components (based upon ExtJs 1.1), and more.

7 hours

1,656 €

CORBA Programming

About

CORBA stands for Common Object Request Broker Architecture. The original idea was to create a single universal standard for how objects across different platforms, programming languages, and network protocols can communicate with each other in a seamless manner. For example, an application developed on say a Sun Workstation running Unix under the programming language C needs to communicate by virtue of some well defined standard interface (the accepted contract) to an Intel-based PC running Windows 2000 developed under Pascal. Without such a standard both sides need to negotiate all the details including the transport protocols. The CORBA standard defines general interface standards that can be supported by different programming languages. It also defines the quality and robustness of the communication, error handling, and recovery. The standard does not cover implementation details, but only specifies the general interface language (IDL) used across all supported languages, exception handling specification, a special transport protocol called IOP that sits on top of TCP/IP, as well as the specific programming language mappings. Using the IDL, an implementation for the specific platform-dependent object is generated which can be compiled using the supported language. This course has been written by:

7 hours

1,656 €

Developing Genealogy Web-Pages

About

This course is designed to cover a variety of separate topics that a genealogist should be familiar with as a means to document the stories and store related images about their family tree. This course is not written to show a genealogist how to prepare and present their GEDCOM information, rather to supplement this information in a way that will be valuable to future generations. This process will work on non-PC computers. HTML files are specific Internet-based files that the browsers were created to read. The folders, filenames, and image types are all the same from machine to machine. The only variation here will be what program you use to edit the HTML (.htm or .html) files. On a PC, I use and recommend Notepad which is included with Microsoft Windows. After saying all this, This course is not designed to teach HTML, but to teach those pieces of Internet-design that will be useful to a genealogist preparing to document their family history on the Internet.

7 hours

1,656 €

Distributed Systems

About

Every process in Unix has an address space that looks like this: Remember the low memory is at the top, and the high memory is at the bottom. So when items are added to the stack, and it grows upwards, each element has a lower memory address. You should know what this does: The call to fork creates a new process with an entire new address space. That means a copy is made of everything: new global vars, new text code, new heap, and new stack. Even object dynamically allocated with malloc are copied. Remember that the pointers to those dynamically-allocated objects are set based on relative addressing, so even the new copied memory is allocated somewhere else, the pointers into the heap still work. The four most popular UNIX process states are ready, waiting, running, and zombie. The first three are easy. Zombie processes are child processes that have completed and are waiting for their parents to clean them up. Usually parents clean up completed (zombie) child processes by calling wait or waitpid. If the parent process dies before the child process finishes, eventually the root process will come around and clean them up.

7 hours

1,656 €

Entry Level PHP Web Application Development

About

This is an entry-level introduction to writing web applications in the PHP programming language. It focuses in providing the reader with all of the information that they need to know to get started with web development, without covering “advanced” programming concepts. This course is not a reference work: it is intended to teach web application development, as well as PHP, to the reader. This course covers PHP 5, and makes use of the features of PHP 5 that are not present in previous major releases of PHP, such as PHP 3 or 4. PHP 5 has been out for long enough that nearly every serious hosting provider should have made the upgrade to it by this point in time. PHP 5 has features that simplify the development process for web applications, and it is recommended. This course makes use of information in Wikipedia as well as on the Internet. As much neutral, objective information as possible is used to allow the reader to perform their own independent research and learning outside of the text of This course as necessary or desired. The goal of This course is to be an extremely high-quality work and to stand on as much pre-published information as available. Citations of, and references to other works should be considered to be normal, and encouraged. There is no “Errata” document published for This course. This course is an evolving work, and any errors are likely to be fixed when pointed out or otherwise found. If there is a possible error to investigate, use the discussion link at the top of the page with questionable information so that it can be investigated. If any information in This course contradicts official documentation or specifications, the reader may make the assumption that the official documentation is correct, unless there is documented, verifiable proof to the contrary.

7 hours

1,656 €

Erlang Programming

About

Erlang is a general purpose, concurrency-oriented functional programming language suited for fault-tolerant, distributed, soft real-time systems. It features strong dynamic typing, lightweight concurrency, eager evaluation and prolog like pattern matching. Erlang was developed in the 1980s at the Ericsson Computer Science Laboratory to address a then-unfulfilled need for telecommunications programming: a high-level, expressive language suitable for rapid development that offered the error recovery, concurrency, distribution and performance features required by telecommunications equipment. Although its roots are in telecommunications, Erlang's unique features and extensive library make it suitable as a general-purpose programming language and well-suited to programming projects such as network servers, control systems and web development. The Erlang language, together with an extensive library of applications and modules, a virtual machine and operating system, and a set of design principles establishing standard behaviors, comprise Erlang/OTP (OTP stands for Open Telecommunications Platform). Erlang/OTP is distributed as free software (under the Apache Public License) as well as a commercially supported version from Ericsson. Both distributions run on Microsoft Windows, VxWorks by Wind River, and many varieties of Unix.

7 hours

1,656 €

Forth

About

The Forth language is a stack-based language designed for rapid interactive programming in limited-resource environments. Forth is interesting because it can be simple and small, yet it allows for remarkably powerful extensions to be written in Forth itself; most fully-fledged Forth systems are implemented partially in Forth. Forth is most often used to write embedded applications. Forth emphasizes a number of classic computer ideas, such as Many ritual necessities of other languages and required designer syntax falls away. Forth is an extensible language, giving the user great flexibility to extend it. This is both a pro and a con. As with modeling clay, in the hands of an architect with a clear philosophy it can work wonders, or it can create a hodgepodge. Much Forth programming consists of "adding words to a dictionary" and learning someone's program, the words they have chosen to create, and their significance is often confused with learning the language itself.

7 hours

1,656 €

GLBasic Programming

About

The GLBasic Language is used in GLBasic, a program that makes programs with OpenGL and BASIC for very much operating systems BUT it's different programming than OpenGL and BASIC. So that you can learn how to program GLBasic in a very easy way! Here are all the things to learn about GLBasic: Warning! The next stuff is only for full version! If the pages are not ready made, it is to do!

7 hours

1,656 €

GTK+ By Example

About

This course aims to be an accessible introduction into creating applications with GTK+ widget toolkit. We introduce widgets and give examples on how to use them. A wikibook is an undertaking similar to an open-source software project: A contributor creates content for the project to help others, for personal enrichment, or to accomplish something for the contributor's own work (e.g., lecture preparation). An open book, just like an open program, requires time to complete, but it can benefit greatly from even modest contributions from readers. For example you can fix "bugs" in the text (where the bug might be typographic, expository, technical, aesthetic or otherwise) in order to make a better book. If you find an opportunity to fix a bug, simply click on "edit", make your changes, and click on save. Other contributors may review your changes to be sure they are appropriate for the course. If you are unsure, you can visit the discussion page and ask there. Use common sense. If you would like to make bigger contributions, you can take a look at the sections or chapters that are too short or otherwise need more work and start writing! Be sure to skim the rest of the course first in order to avoid duplication of content. Additionally, you should read the Guidelines for Contributors page for consistency tips and advice. Note that you don't need to contribute everything at once. You can mark sections as "TODO," with a description of what remains to be done, and perhaps someone else will finish those parts for you. Once all TODO items are finished, we'll have reached our First Edition!

7 hours

1,656 €

J2ME Programming

About

Welcome to the J2ME Programming. This course not only covers the MIDP device programming; but, also the full J2ME Platform. Here you will find tutorials, tool listings, and etc. Generally, the APIs of a family of devices is an API(Profile) or APIs(Profiles) on top of the language definition(configuration profile). The Profiles(APIs): In J2ME small devices performance of the JVM also contributes to how the language definition is implemented. For a clear picture view this article: Often, in order to understand what optional APIs are used with specific devices we need to understand the underlying consumer platform in which our J2ME technology is in fact implemented. For example, if you know the SymbianOS version of a SymbianOS powered device than you have a clear idea what optional J2ME APis are included on that device. As Mobile Operating Systems and CPUs merge than it becomes important to also know what CPU is in the device or even what cellular network or network infrastructure the device is connected or interfaces with in its operation. thus, this section covers operating systems, CPUs, and network infrastructure as it relates to J2ME programming and J2ME application development.

7 hours

1,656 €

Valgrind

About

Valgrind is a utility for debugging programs for the x86 and x86-64 Linux platforms. It has recently become highly popular as it can be used to easily track down memory management and threading bugs that are hard to track down otherwise. There is a "generic" option, available on most systems, which involves compiling: On most Linux distributions, however, you can use the package management system. For example, in Debian GNU/Linux (and derivatives) simply run: Valgrind can be run simply by prefixing the command line that you run with valgrind This simple test will check that the memory accesses with in the program are correct. Do not be surprised when you get messages about code that you know is not a problem. This program tests every access and some programs are forgiving about existing errors. It is always worth fixing these extra errors because they will be impossible to track down when they do cause a breakage in code. You may prefer to run valgrind and log to a text file, with the following options:


7 hours

1,656 €

.NET Development Foundation

About

Welcome to the 'Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 Application Development Foundation' course. This course provides extensive "course like" coverage of the exam objectives associated with exam 70-536 of the Microsoft certification program. Those objectives cover the basic .NET class libraries and the interaction of a program with the .NET execution environment. The participants for this study course are software developers professionally interested in the .NET framework. Microsoft states in the Exam (70-536) preparation guide that "Candidates should have at least two to three years of experience developing Web-based, Microsoft Windows-based, or distributed applications by using the .NET Framework 1.0, the .NET Framework 1.1, and the .NET Framework 2.0. Candidates should have a working knowledge of Visual Studio 2005.". 


7 hours

1,656 €

Amiblitz

About

Amiga Blitz Basic is amiblitz. A few features of Amiga Blitz Basic that make it distinctive are: Amiga Blitz Basic was originally developed as commercial software under the name of Blitz Basic and then Blitz Basic 2 by Simon Armstrong and Mark Sibley of Acid Software in New Zealand. It was later re-released as freeware under the GNU General Public License. More recently Bernd Roesch and others of Amiforce have continued development of the editor and compiler, under the name Amiblitz. Amiga Blitz Basic is free and can be downloaded http://www.amiforce.de The download file contains an installer and full instructions. Amiga Blitz Basic requires either an original Amiga computer with Kickstart and Workbench versions 3.0 or above, 12Mb Hard disk space, and an FPU, or an emulated Amiga (such as UAE or Amiga Forever) running on modern PC hardware. The latter is likely to be much faster and trouble free.

7 hours

1,656 €

APE Users Guide

About

APE Users Guide is a course designed to help you get the most out of the open source 2D physics engine APE. APE (Actionscript Physics Engine) is written in AS3 and is designed for use in Flash or Flex games and applications. APE is a 2D physics engine written in Actionscript 3 for use in Flash and Flex. You can simulate 2D dynamics by using particles and connecting them with constraints to create more complex shapes. The engine currently has 3 different kinds of particle classes - the CircleParticle, RectangleParticle, and WheelParticle, and one type of constraint - the SpringConstraint.

7 hours

1,656 €

Application Development with Harbour

About

Cross platform application development is a challenging task. Many script languages are designed to run on interpreters that are available for many operating systems. The harbour-project has a different approach. It is capable of compiling native applications for many operating systems like MS-DOS, Windows (32 & 64), Windows CE, Pocket PC, OS/2, GNU/Linux and Mac OS X and you only write one source code. The Harbour Project is a Free Open Source Software effort to build a multiplatform Clipper language compiler. If you know nothing about harbour, you will get step-by-step instructions and many working code samples that help you get started so you can feel the power Right now, this is just a rough draft.

7 hours

1,656 €

Asymptote

About

This is a user-maintained reference to the Asymptote markup language. It is intended that this can serve as a useful resource for everyone from new users who wish to learn, to old hands who need a quick reference. This section should contain recipes for different tasks. Please help to make the command pages: asy -l | grep '(' and add the functions to the command page along with info and examples. This is the default Asymptote base file, which defines key parts of the drawing language (such as the picture structure). By default, an implicit private import plain; occurs before translating a file and before the first command given in interactive mode. This also applies when translating files for module definitions (except when translating plain, of course). This means that the types and functions defined in plain are accessible in almost all Asymptote code. Use the -noautoplain command-line option to disable this feature. abort abs acos acosh add alias align all angle arc ArcArrow ArcArrows arcarrowsize arcdir arclength arcpoint arctime arrow Arrow arrow2 arrowhead arrowheadbbox Arrows arrowsize asin asinh ask atan atan2 atanh atexit attach AvantGarde axialshade azimuth bar Bar Bars barsize basealign baseline bbox BeginArcArrow BeginArrow BeginBar beginclip BeginDotMargin begingroup BeginMargin BeginPenMargin beginpoint Blank Bookman box cap cast cbrt cd ceil Ceil circle clear clip close cmyk colatitude colors complement concat conj controls copy cos cosh Courier cross csv cubiclength cubicroots curl cycle cyclic deconstruct defaultpen degrees Degrees dimension dir dirtime dot DotMargin DotMargins dotsize Dotted _draw draw Draw ecast ellipse empty EndArcArrow EndArrow EndBar endclip EndDotMargin endgroup endl EndMargin EndPenMargin endpoint eof eol erase erf erfc error _eval eval execute exitfunction exp expi fabs fft fill Fill filldraw fillrule filltype find finite firstcut floor Floor flush fmod font fontcommand fontsize format gamma getc getint getpair getreal getstring gouraudshade graphic gray grestore gsave gui GUI GUIop GUIreset Helvetica hypot identity image init initdefaults input insert inside interact interp intersect intersectionpoint inverse invisible italic J label Label labelmargin labels Landscape lastcut latitude latticeshade layer legend length line linecap linejoin lineskip linetype linewidth log log10 longitude Longitude makedraw makepen map margin Margin Margins marginT Mark marker marknodes markroutine markuniform math max maxbound maxcoords merge MidArcArrow MidArrow midpoint min minbound minipage NewCenturySchoolBook newpage nib NoFill NoMargin none None nullexitfcn orientation output overwrite Palatino pattern pause Pen PenMargin PenMargins point polar polygon Portrait postcontrol postscript pow10 precision precontrol prepend quadraticroots quiet quotient radialshade RadialShade rand read1 read2 read3 readGUI readline realmult rectify reflect relative Relative - specifies a relative location. relativedistance reldir relpoint reltime remainder replace resetdefaultpen restore restoredefaults reverse rfind rgb rotate round Round scale scroll search Seascape seek sequence sgn shift shiftless shipout sin single sinh size slant solve sort spec sqrt srand straight subpath substr suffix sum Symbol system tab tan tanh tell tension tex texify TeXify texpreamble time TimesRoman transpose tridiagonal trim TrueMargin unfill UnFill unit uptodate VERSION write xinput xoutput xpart xscale xtrans Y ypart yscale ytrans ZapfChancery ZapfDingbats zpart

7 hours

1,656 €

ATS: Programming with Theorem-Proving

About

ATS is a programming language that unifies specification and implementation. It is equipped with a highly expressive type system rooted in the framework Applied Type System, which also gives the language its name. In ATS, a variety of programming paradigms are supported, including functional programming, imperative programming, (a restricted form of) object-oriented programming, modular programming, etc. In addition, ATS contains a theorem-proving component ATS/LF that allows proofs to be constructed as total functions. With this component, ATS advocates a programmer-centric approach to program verification that combines programming with theorem proving: How do we know that a program is correctly implemented? We ask the programmer implementing the program to also construct a proof attesting to that the program meets its specification. Furthermore, the theorem-proving component ATS/LF may be used as a logical framework for encoding various deduction systems and their (meta-)properties. What makes ATS distinctive is its emphasis on employing types and proofs to ensure program safety. For example, dereferencing null-pointers can be ruled out in ATS statically, i.e., at compile-time; out-of-bounds array subscripting can be ruled out statically; improper handling of memory such as leaking and double-freeing can be ruled out statically; etc. More importantly, ATS offers the programmer a great deal of flexibility in designing a type-based approach to capturing specific safety violations that he or she is interested in. This course is aimed to introduce you to the ATS programming language, from the basics to the most advanced features and is positioned be an alternative presentation of the official tutorial. We do not aim to teach you programming, for which you should consult other books (e.g. HtDP).

7 hours

1,656 €

Beginning Java

About

The Java programming language is used widely in education and industry, and is a great choice as a first programming language. The aim of This course is to provide a starting point for readers not only new to Java but to programming in general in a progressive order with examples they can follow. If you want to edit or contribute, feel free to dig in and start editing, you are entirely encouraged to be bold. For those who don't know Java and wish to learn, or are simply interested in Java, feedback is requested and much appreciated. Table of Contents

7 hours

1,656 €

Business Basic

About

Programming in Business Basic This is a place holder for the new Business Basic manual. Our goal is to create a replacement for Scott Bruce Ryan's out of date (1988) "What do you do after it says: READY>" for BBx/BBj, ProvideX and Thoroughbred. Business Basic is an interactive high-level programming language developed for minicomputer systems in the early 1970s. Derived from the original Dartmouth BASIC, Business Basic extended the language concepts by introducing file indexing methods which evolved into true keyed access technology similar to those methods available to COBOL programmers. Because of its interactive nature, Business Basic affords runtime event trapping capabilities, though the character-based systems did not permit the wide range of events that modern graphical environments do. Business Basic interpreters also offer extensive diagnostic capabilities, permitting developers to resolve live problems through telephone support without constantly having to ship updates. The interpretive nature of Business Basic also enhances development efforts through permitting quick testing and debugging of code. There are two primary "groups" or "families" of the Business Basic programming language: Other Business Basics have risen from the Point 4 systems running under IRIS.

7 hours

1,656 €

Carbon Programming

About

Carbon is one of the application programming interfaces (APIs) for the Macintosh operating system, providing C programming language access to Macintosh system services. Carbon is one of four APIs that may be accessed from a Mac OS X program; the others are Cocoa, POSIX (including X Window), and Java. These APIs have some overlapping and some exclusive capabilities; as the functionality of Mac OS X changes they have not been kept in sync. Carbon provides a good degree of backward compatibility for programs to run on the now-obsolete Mac OS 8 and 9, but support for those systems has not been updated since 2001. "Carbon" has since become an umbrella term for C-language access to Macintosh-specific services, regardless of backward compatibility. The transition to 64-bit Macintosh applications beginning with Mac OS X v10.5 has brought the first major limitations to Carbon. Apple does not provide compatibility between the Macintosh graphical user interface and the C programming language in the 64-bit environment, instead requiring the use of the Objective-C dialect with the Cocoa API. Although Apple has always claimed that Objective-C is easy to learn, the required transition has slowed development of large Carbon-based applications such Adobe Photoshop.

7 hours

1,656 €

Learn Component Based Development

About

This course is an introduction to component based development. Review of HTML, HTTP and networking fundamentals. Introduction to servlets, JSP and tag libraries. We introduce JPA and Hibernate. In this context two technologies are interesting, JSF and Apache Struts. Spring is a good example for dependency injection. Webservices, notably SOAP and REST have established themselves firmly. Here we may talk about JMS and EJB. Here we may talk about Grinder, Proxies and the Cloud. Don't leave home without it. How to test enterprise applications.

Content

  • Introduction
  • Basics
  • Serverside Programming
  • Object relational Mapping
  • Model View Controller
  • Dependency Injection
  • Webservices
  • Enterprise Topics
  • Scalability
  • Security
  • Software Tests
  • Template Engines
  • Modular Software
    • Additional Chapters

7 hours

1,656 €

Concurrent Clean

About

Concurrent Clean is a general-purpose purely functional programming language. This course is meant to be a companion Part I of Functional Programming in Clean. "Concurrent" refers to Clean's ability to run the same process on several computers, similar to Ada. The language is often just referred to as Clean. About Clean 1.1 The Language Reference Manual The language manual can be found at the Documentation page of the Clean website. Programming in Clean 2.1 Getting Started The Clean compiler can be found here [1]. Please register, as requested, though it is not necessary (you can click on "Download clean" on the left.) The .7z package is the quickest to download for Windows programming, if you have 7-zip. Then, get Part I of Functional Programming in Clean; get the 1-up PDF version if you plan to study from the computer.

7 hours

1,656 €

D Programming

About

The goal for This course is to create a complete, free, open-content, well-organized online book for the D programming language. D is a programming language being designed as a successor to C++. Until this page gets better written and more informative, the D home can be found here. This course aims at beginners learning D language. It will cover all the language basics and some design aspects. In addition it will introduce topics like multi-threading, GUI programming and standard library to get you started with real-world applications. To quote Walter Bright, the author of the D Programming Language: D is a statically-typed, multi-paradigm language supporting imperative programming, object-oriented programming, and template metaprogramming. It also supports generics and design by contract. D has many features not seen in C++, implementing design by contract, unit testing, true modules, automatic memory management (garbage collection), first class arrays, associative arrays, dynamic arrays, array slicing, nested functions, inner classes, closures (anonymous functions), and has a reengineered template syntax. D retains C++'s ability to do low-level coding, and adds to it with support for an integrated inline assembler. C++ multiple inheritance is replaced by single inheritance with interfaces and mixins. D's declaration, statement and expression syntax closely matches that of C++.

7 hours

1,656 €

DirectX

About

DirectX is a Windows hardware abstraction. It's primarily known for it's use in graphics; however it has many other applications, as it was made with media and entertainment in mind. To program with DirectX, you need to understand its basic layout. First of all, DirectX is a group of components; including Direct3D, DirectDraw, DirectSound, and DirectInput. Most of these components have been depreciated and are no longer developed because they are simply wrappers for Win32 functions. However, they still have their uses. Learning to program with DirectX is hard. That being said, I will explain what is required and expected of you by this course. First and foremost - you must have the DirectX libraries installed. These may be distributed with compilers, or, if you use one, the IDE (basic DirectX functionality is generally provided with Windows IDEs). If you don’t have these libraries, or want more recent distributions, you can obtain the SDK here: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=4b78a58a-e672-4b83-a28e-72b5e93bd60a&DisplayLang=en This is a very large development kit (400 MB), complete with examples and useful utilities. Secondly - You must know a language that can link with C++ libraries. Most native languages and several managed languages can do this, but it's easiest if you can just use C++. This course will not go over basic programming concepts, or even some of the advanced concepts which are frequently used by DirectX, such as pointers and abstract classes. Don't come back without knowing these, or you won't understand what we're doing or why we're doing it. The DirectX 9 book does not cover Window creating or message handling.

7 hours

1,656 €

FLTK

About

FLTK ( http://www.fltk.org/ ) is a cross-platform application framework that natively supports OpenGL. It's lightweight, can be statically linked, and comes with a graphical GUI designer named FLUID. This course is about FLTK 2.0 which is still under development. The current stable version (1.0) already has a comprehensive documentation, though it is mostly a reference. Version 2.0 adds UTF-8 support, theming, as well as many improvements for the developer. The FLTK roadmap listing missing features and bugs is available here: FLTK roadmap. Note that there's no release date for FLTK 2.0 and some of its parts are still in alpha state. Moreover, the API can change before the official release. If you need a stable framework, please use FLTK 1.1 (though it has an entirely different API). FLTK framework uses a modified GNU Lesser General Public License version 2.0 (LGPL 2.0). The modifications allow not to publish your own source code, except changes to FLTK framework code itself or of any program that uses an altered version of FLTK with static linking (a derived LGPL version of the framework can be used with a closed source project). You are also required to name FLTK somewhere in you application or documentation. FLTK based applications usually build without source modification on the following platforms:

7 hours

1,656 €

FORA

About

FORA Description FORA is a dynamically typed, functional programming language. It provides many of the benefits of high-level dynamic languages like Python or R, including: FORA code executes as quickly as code written in statically typed, like Java (compiled to bytecode and run on a Virtual Machine) or compiled languages like C++. FORA achieves these speedups by employing dynamic optimization techniques. FORA runs all new code in an interpreter, collecting statistics about the types and values of the objects it’s manipulating. A separate thread determines which code is “hot,” attempts to generate strongly-typed code equivalent to the dynamically typed code, and then produces optimized machine code.

7 hours

1,656 €

FPI Script

About

The FPI scripting language is a simple trigger-based artificial intelligence language used to program objects in games. It consist of a simple if/then syntax and a pre-defined list of conditional statements and commands. The statements start with a colon. Following that is a condition, a test to see if something is true. If there is more than one condition, they are separated by a comma. After all the conditions have been listed, there is another colon. The second colon separates the conditions from the actions. If you are familiar with other programming languages, this is similar to an IF THEN conditional statement. if(CONDITION) { ACTION } Translates to: There is also comments to help you organize a script, comments start with a semicolon e.g. FPI script can be used for a number of operations including object behaviour and Artificial intelligence scripts. A more detailed description of each clause and examples can be found in FPI Usage Examples

7 hours

1,656 €

Go From Scratch

About

Go from Scratch An introduction to Google's open source Go programming language that does not require experience with another programming language (C, Java, etc.) Contributing to Go From Scratch - Current plans and areas in need. Assumptions - What you should know going into this course. Existing Resources - Official and unofficial documentation for reference. What You'll Need - What tools to use to proceed with learning Go. The Origin of Go - Whodunit, and why they done it. The Language - In broad strokes. Compared To... - Go vs. other languages. The Flow of Go - The basics; how programs are arranged.

7 hours

1,656 €

GUI Design Principles

About

Generally accepted principles for Graphical user interface design are: 1. Aesthetically pleasing Provide visual appeal by following these presentation and graphic design principles: 2. Clarity The interface should be visually, conceptually and linguistically clear, including 3. Compatibility Provide compatibility with the following: 4. Comprehensibility A system should be easily understood and learned. A user should know the following 5. Configurability Permit easy personalization, configuration and reconfiguration of settings. 6. Consistency A system should look, act, and operate the same throughput. Similar components should: 7. Control The user must control the interaction. 8. Directness Provide direct ways to accomplish tasks 9. Efficiency

7 hours

1,656 €

Harvard Chart Method

About

Harvard Chart Method of Logical Equation Reduction[1][2] was developed to address the need to automate the process of logical equation reduction in the early days of computer hardware and switching circuit development. Large scale production of computer circuitry entailed many more variables than could be reasonably handled by manual methods using Boolean logic, Venn diagrams, etc. Automated methods of logical equation reduction were necessary to minimize logic circuits and thereby reduce the number of logic gates which used vacuum tubes as switches due to their relatively high cost and excessive thermal emission. The Harvard Chart Method of logical equation reduction is capable of reducing binary logical equations having five or more variables to minimum form. As the number of variables increase, the number of operations required to minimize a logical equation increases exponentially, placing practical limits on performing logical equation reduction by hand. The Harvard Chart Method was developed to solve this problem by using a computerized method to automate the process of logical reduction. The method represents one of the first instances where computers were able to assist in the design of the circuits of which they are made. Application of this method is limited only by the logical speed and size of the computer (or computer network) on which it is run. A method based on the Harvard Chart Method has since been developed to reduce multi-valued logical equations to minimum form. (note this chart uses upper case to represent the logic state of "TRUE" and lower case to represent the logic state of "FALSE"

7 hours

1,656 €

How to Write a Compiler

About

Many programmers see writing a compiler as the ultimate challenge. Unfortunately, most programmers also see writing a compiler as an extremely complex and daunting task. Writing a compiler doesn't need to be complicated, however. Before delving into the process of actually writing the compiler, a few key concepts must be learned. One of the keys to understanding how a compiler works is to understand the concept of abstraction. For example, when you get into a car and start the engine, you are actually performing a large number of smaller steps. You are using your muscles to maneuver your body into the vehicle. You are placing the key into the ignition. You are then turning the key until the car starts. In the same way, understanding a compiler requires us to step back and see the process as a series of larger tasks. We need to: Each of these steps is seen as a task, yet each consists of much smaller steps. Accepting an input file, for example, means checking for its existence, checking file permissions, and other related tasks. In the same way parsing the file requires breaking the contents into smaller and smaller units that we can then interpret according to the language's syntax.

7 hours

1,656 €

How Wikipedia Works

About

How Wikipedia Works is a wiki remix of the 2008 book by Phoebe Ayers, Charles Matthews, and Ben Yates, with technical edits by Samuel Klein. It is a guide to understanding and using Wikipedia, for readers with a basic understanding of the project. It was published in the United States by No Starch Press under the GFDL, so that it would be compatible with Wikimedia projects, and in 2013 was relicensed under CC-BY-SA (see talk). We cover Wikipedia from soup to nuts: for readers trying to understand what’s in Wikipedia, how and why it got there, and how to analyze the quality of the content you might find on the site; for current and future editors, from basic editing techniques and wikisyntax to not-so-basic information on complicated syntax, referencing and researching content, and editing collaboratively and harmoniously; and finally for anyone interested in how Wikipedia’s vibrant and complicated community comes together to produce content, resolve disputes, and keep the site running. Finally, we touch on the wider world of Wikipedias in other languages, other Wikimedia projects, and the Wikimedia Foundation itself. We close with appendices about reusing Wikipedia content according to the terms of the GFDL license, and thoughts on using Wikipedia in a classroom setting. Throughout, we provide community consensus viewpoints and our own thoughts on a common-sense approach to using and participating in Wikipedia, and a selection of carefully-chosen links to the thousands of pages of documentation, help and Wikipedia-space pages that we discuss — not to mention a sprinkling of humor. In every discussion, we try to provide a sense of the community that supports and is at the heart of the Wikipedia project and mission.

7 hours

1,656 €

Icon Programming

About

Icon is a modern high-level programming language. It provides many useful features for managing data, generators and much more. It is not object-oriented, but the UN-icon variant, UNICON, is object-oriented as is ObjectIcon (code.google.com/p/objecticon) Here is a tiny but complete Icon program. As you see, the code is very simple. Lines procedure main() and end enclose the body of the program. The second line is responsible for printing Hello world! on your standard output (usually screen). Naturally, procedure write prints the string which is given as a parameter. There is a similar procedure read which reads a line from standard input (usually keyboard). Save the program from the previous section to file helloworld.icn. Type in linux shell. The executable file named helloworld will be generated. You can run it now. The program consists of procedures. Every procedure begins with procedure reserved word followed by the name of the procedure and list of arguments (it can be empty). The procedure ends with end. All the instructions are separated by newline or semicolon.

7 hours

1,656 €

Introduction to C++

About

C++ is a general-purpose programming language as an extension of the C programming language, or "C with Classes". The language has expanded significantly over time, and modern C++ now has object-oriented, generic, and functional features in addition to facilities for low-level memory manipulation. It is almost always implemented as a compiled language, and many vendors provide C++ compilers, including the Free Software Foundation, LLVM, Microsoft, Intel, Oracle, and IBM, so it is available on many platforms.

C++ was designed with a bias toward system programming and embedded, resource-constrained software and large systems, with performance, efficiency, and flexibility of use as its design highlights. C++ has also been found useful in many other contexts, with key strengths being software infrastructure and resource-constrained applications, including desktop applications, video games, servers (e.g. e-commerce, Web search, or SQL servers), and performance-critical applications (e.g. telephone switches or space probes).

Content

  • Language

    • Object storage

      • Static storage duration objects

      • Thread storage duration objects

      • Automatic storage duration objects

      • Dynamic storage duration objects

    • Templates

    • Objects

      • Encapsulation

      • Inheritance

    • Operators and operator overloading

    • Polymorphism

      • Static polymorphism

      • Dynamic polymorphism

        • Inheritance

        • Virtual member functions

    • Lambda expressions

    • Exception handling

  • Standard library

  • C++ Core Guidelines


7 hours

1,656 €

Introducing Julia

About

The Julia programming language is easy to use, fast, and powerful. This course is intended as an introduction to the language for the less experienced and occasional programmer. For more learning materials, including links to books, videos, articles/blogs and notebooks, refer to the learning section at Julia's official site. The official Julia documentation is excellent, and you should refer to it as often as possible. The Julia community has established a good ethos of encouraging participation in the development of the language on github. The advantage of This course is that it's made and edited by the Julia community – you can edit anything at any time. If you find something that's wrong, or unclear, feel free to correct it, or add examples. (Your first few edits are reviewed, just in case you have less than good intentions. And, as with the Wikipedia, you should expect your writing to be edited by others!) The focus should be largely on the new user, rather than the computer science expert.

7 hours

1,656 €

Introduction to BASIC

About

BASIC was originally implemented as a combined computer language and command interpreter invented in 1964 at Dartmouth College by J. Kemeny and T. Kurtz. it was an important part of a project to make timeshared computer access available to a large community, in this case Dartmouth College. It was first implemented on a GE 225 computer. BASIC combines both programming and computer control into a single interface. The language is a simple set of variable assignments, control flow and data handling. It was designed to be easier for most users than Fortran, but the Dartmouth version, surprisingly, included matrix operations which have not been part of most other implementations. The computer control allows the user to perform simple commands such as file save & load and program start and stop. Because BASIC can be interpreted, and because more or less useful variants can be implemented with a small interpreter, it was an attractive choice as a high-level language for the earliest microcomputers. BASIC interpreters were generally supplied burned into ROMs which were limited (in affordable sizes) to 2KB or 4KB. Apple supplied its IntegerBASIC in ROM with the Apple II; Microsoft began as a specialist in providing ROMed BASICs to assorted computer vendors, including Atari, Altair (the original Microsoft product!), Commodore (PET / VIC-20 / 64), Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 1, 2, etc and the Color Computer), and even, rather later on, IBM in its earliest PC models (ie, BASICA). Because the amount of RAM available on many of these early machines was severely limited, most of the ROMed BASICS had an extremely limited and abbreviated syntax to permit more than toy programs to fit into the installed RAM. Inevitably, this produced an opaque and obscure programming style. For instance, in most Microsoft BASICs, commented lines could begin with a single "'" character, rather than the original "REM", most commands could be abbreviated to the first letter ("L" for "LET"), variable names could be similarly contracted, and so on.

7 hours

1,656 €

Irony - Language Implementation Kit

About

Irony is a development kit for implementing languages on the .NET platform. It uses the flexibility and power of the C# language and .NET Framework 3.5 to implement a completely new and streamlined technology of compiler construction. Unlike most existing yacc/lex-style solutions, Irony does not employ any scanner or parser code generation from grammar specifications written in a specialized meta-language. In Irony, the target language grammar is coded directly in C# using operator overloading to express grammar constructs. Irony's scanner and parser modules use the grammar encoded as a C# class to control the parsing process. The Irony project is hosted on CodePlex. Do not fill out yet as code base is subject to major changes in this area!

7 hours

1,656 €

Lambda Calculus

About

Lambda Calculus is a formal language which facilitates the definition of the notion of a computable function. The calculus was first developed by Alonzo Church in the 1930s and is closely related to Alan Turing's reflections on the nature of computing. In general the class of functions definable by the calculus is equivalent to those computable by a Turing machine. The calculus has been influential in computer science and linguistics as well as in mathematics. As well as the theoretical interest of the calculus, various attempts have been made to implement it as a practical computing system — each more or less directly. Among these languages Lisp, Scheme and Haskell are notably, and variously, related to lambda calculus. The two central language constructs of the calculus are abstraction and application, which are the fundamental constructions. All other programming constructs differ in the way their evaluation strategies are implemented. Furthermore, its syntax can be further extended and simplified.

7 hours

1,656 €

Learning D With Project Euler

About

D is a systems programming language. Its focus is on combining the power and high performance of C and C++ with the programmer productivity of modern languages like Ruby and Python. Special attention is given to the needs of quality assurance, documentation, management, portability and reliability.[1] Project Euler is a website dedicated to a series of math problems intended to be solved with computer programs. Each problem has been designed according to a "one-minute rule", which means that an efficient implementation will allow a solution to be obtained on a modestly powered computer in less than one minute.[2] In this article, I pick some problems and show you how to solve them with D. First, we need a D compiler. All the examples below use dmd 2.0.32, you can download it from the official website. Extract the compiler from the zip file and try compiling the "Hello World" program: If you are using Windows, simply run something like this:

7 hours

1,656 €

Linoleum

About

L.In.O.L.E.U.M. (also called Linoleum or Lino) is a programming language developed by Alessandro Ghignola. It is an assembler, easier than native assembly, and twice as fast as C/C++. Uniquely it is designed to be recompilable across CPUs. Compilers are free. Versions exist for Linux and Windows, although the Linux port is currently incomplete (most features are working). Currently, compilable files use the extension ".txt". After installing, in Windows, right-clicking on a txt file gives the option to read into notepad (as usual) or compile into a Linoleum executable file ".exe". Code is cleaner and simpler than C, with comments appearing in parentheses (like so), which seems rather obvious and then someone does it. Code from MyLinoClock4.0:A tutorial to introduce Linoleum to people new to programming has been written by the user known on the anynowhere.com community as Ponche. It is available there, along with French and Italian translations and an editable version, in the "l.in.oleum" section under "Advice For Newbies".

7 hours

1,656 €

Logo Programming

About

Logo inherits lists from Lisp, and they are its primary method of storing vectors. Arrays are also provided. One way would be to use iteration. Another, more elegant way would be This method uses recursion, and is an example of a functional rather than an imperative programming approach. And a more general way would be Logo provides several common control structures. There are iteration commands Recursion is Logo's preferred processing paradigm. Logo also provides list-based control structures. The basic idea is that you have two lists each of the commands is applied in turn to each of the data items. There are several of these template commands with names like MAP, APPLY, FILTER, FOREACH, REDUCE and CASCADE. They represent four flavours of template iteration, known as explicit-slot, named-procedure, named-slot (or Lambda), and procedure-text.

7 hours

1,656 €

Learn Lua in SpringRTS

About

This course is going to help developers using Lua with the open-source SpringRTS game engine. This course covers mostly the integration of SpringRTS with Lua. This integration takes place in the form of widgets, gadgets, mods, maps. All these elements can be created with the use of Lua and the inbuilt functions and variables that the Spring Engine provides. It is assumed that the reader already has some basic knowledge of the Lua language. If you don't, then it is highly recommended that you first read the free Programming in Lua. A more fun way is by getting the source of widgets(which can be found here) and try to modify them and understand how they work. 

Content

  1. What is the Spring engine
  2. Lua integration with Spring
  3. Spring specifications
    • Synced Mode
    • Unsynced Mode
    • Gadgets
    • Widgets
  4. Games(mods)
    • Mod Structure
    • Units
      • 3D Models
      • Animations
      • Weapons
    • Features
    • Common identifiers
  5. Maps
  6. Spring API
    • Variables and Constants
    • Callins
    • Callouts

7 hours

1,656 €

NetBeans

About

NetBeans is an cross-platform open source Java-based IDE. NetBeans was originally developed by Oracle but was picked up by the Apache Foundation in late 2016. Netbeans supports a wide-range of projects and languages, from C++ desktop applications to HTML5 based websites. NetBeans has a full range of plugins you can install which can expand NetBeans' versatility. This course will teach how to use NetBeans, the tools included like the drag-and-drop Swing builder, and setting up NetBeans for different project types. This course will not cover the Java language in depth. If you want to learn the Java language you can read the WikiBook Java Programming

7 hours

1,656 €

Plug-in Development for Google Desktop

About

You need to create a COM object GD uses COM objects as plugins. Actually these are like ActiveX components. They are meant to be reusable. In Visual Studio, create a C# Class Library. You should implement two (2) methods: This function is called whenever you register your COM object to the system. You can put initialization code here, like code that will register our plugin to GD (Details later). This function is called whenever you unregister your COM object. You should have the following statement: After building your Class Library project, Visual Studio will generate the following file types in your output folder: .dll and .tlb The .dll file generated is actually a COM object that we need to register to the system.

7 hours

1,656 €

Programming with ooc

About

Welcome to the Programming with OOC. This is the first comprehensive effort to cover the entirety of the OOC language, among with a collection of idioms, in order to allow the general public to discover the language. ooc is a modern, self-hosting, object-oriented, functional-ish, high-level, low-level sexy programming language, starring closures, interfaces, enums, garbage collection.. It strives to be powerful, modular, extensible, portable, yet simple and fast. The main implementation OOC is rock, a self-hosting compiler which translates OOC sources to C source code, and then use a C compiler to produce an executable.

7 hours

1,656 €

REALbasic

About

Welcome to the REALbasic community maintained manual for beginning and intermediate users of the REALbasic computer programming language. This project is not an effort to recreate existing REALbasic documentation. Instead, our goal is create materials that can be used to teach programming skills using REALbasic. We want contributors to assume the readers of these pages are new not only to REALbasic, but to programming in general. Our goal is a complete beginners' guide to programming, not a guide to advanced techniques in REALbasic. Teachers and students are our primary audience. A secondary audience would be those individuals wanting to learn programming independently using REALbasic. To contribute to this project, please adhere to the standard book structure. We will also develop a Style Guide for this specific manual. It is key that all conventions be followed to ensure the print output generation functions properly.

7 hours

1,656 €

SQL/400

About

SQL/400 is a proprietary dialect of SQL for the IBM AS/400, which was later rebranded as iSeries and finally as SystemI, business eServer Computer Platform. It comes in several flavors, or ways that SQL can be run. All the AS/400 languages that support Static Embedded SQL also support Dynamic Embedded SQL. Static Embedded SQL statments are written into the source code of the high level language program, then an SQL Precompiler converts the SQL statements to a form that is acceptable to the high level language compiler. Dynamic SQL Statements are composed, prepared and run when the program is run. SQL statements can be placed within the calculations of an RPG program ... detail calculations, total calculations, or an RPG Subroutine. RPG identifies what section of a program, using a character in position 6 with a C for calculations. Here is how SQL statements are usually embedded in RPG program calculations. There can be any number of SQL Statements. Notice the slash at beginning of the first and last lines, that delineate the beginning and end of the SQL statements embedded in the RPG code. Notice the plus sign at the beginning of each SQL statement.

7 hours

1,656 €

TeX

About

TeX is a language used to typeset documents, especially ones containing mathematics. It has both programming and mark-up features. In This course we will describe "primitive TeX"—the basic engine for the macro languages plain TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and so on. If you are new to TeX, then this is probably not what you want to read: you may be looking for LaTeX, a macro package for TeX that makes it easier to produce standard documents. TeX is Donald Knuth's macro language, written to typeset documents. TeX can in principle be used for any kind of program (it is a Turing complete programming language). The canonical source for learning the TeX language, both to write documents and to program, is the TeXbook by Donald Knuth. There's also a comprehensive programmer's reference called TeX by topic which the author has generously made available free at his website as well as TeX for the Impatient. We describe the basic anatomy of TeX: the registers, the parameters, and other resource that affect the processing of a TeX source file.

7 hours

1,656 €

The Zope 3 Book

About

This course is about Zope 3, a Python framework for web application development. Zope 3 was developed by the Zope community with the leadership of Jim Fulton, the creator of original Zope. Zope 3 consists of a number of small frameworks and libraries written in Python programming language and it is usable in pieces or in whole. These frameworks and libraries can be put together to build any kind of web application. Most of the Zope 3 packages are built on top of a component architecture which helps to separate presentation code from the problem domain code and to create reusable components. The goal for this project is to create a complete, free, open-content, well-organized book for Zope 3. The target audience of This course are Python programmers looking for developing web applications. However, the course doesn't assume you are familiar with any other web framework. This course will require prior knowledge Python programming language and at least some exposure to the basics of HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

7 hours

1,656 €

TI-Basic Programs

About

This course is a collection of TI-BASIC programs and their codes. By copying the code into your own TI-83+/TI-84 calculator, you will be able to use any of these programs on your own. There are just a few steps to follow in order to write a program onto your TI-83+ or TI-84 calculator using TI-BASIC.

  1. Turn on your calculator and press the PRGM button.
  2. Press the right arrow button twice to move to NEW.
  3. Press Enter to select Create New.
  4. Name the program. If the program is of your own creation, give it whatever name you would like it to have using the letters above each button or any of the numbers 0-9. If you are copying a program from this book, type in the name already given.
  5. Write the code of the program by using the digits and commands found on the calculator and by using the PRGM sub-menus while within the program code. These menus contain lists of many of the most vital programming commands, such as If, Then, End, While, Menu(, and many others. Other helpful menus of commands are the MATH, TEST, and DRAW command lists.

Note: Some of the programs in This course use lower-case letters in their program codes. In order for a TI calculator user to type in lower-case letters you must have MirageOS on your calculator. You must also check the checkbox for Enable Lowercase in Miscellaneous Options on the Options screen within MirageOS. The Options screen can be opened by pressing the ALPHA key in MirageOS. RAOSX is also useful for enabling lowercase letters and other common assembly functions. All of these can be used with the TI-83 and TI-84


7 hours

1,656 €

Using the 3D Connexion SDK

About

For many people, developing software based on a specific piece of hardware can be a daunting task. This course is aimed at those with one year or less experience in programming. It is ideal to inspire those new to programming through practical exercises based on a real world example. The main language used in This course will be Visual Basic. Many experienced programmers will pick up the basics of the SDK quickly and soon begin making their own software. Please feel free to add a chapter on your program—the more the merrier. Some of the content of This course goes above the level of understanding required to effectively use Visual Basic. These paragraphs will be clearly identified using a different color Getting Started Chapter 1: An Introduction to Visual Basic

7 hours

1,656 €

Z80 Assembly

About

This course covers assembly language programming for the Zilog Z80 family of microprocessors. The Zilog Z80 is an 8-bit processor that was used in a wide range of personal computers, and continues to be used in embedded devices to this day. Notable uses include: The Sharp MZ and X1 series also used Z80-compatible processors. A related processor was used in the production of the Nintendo Game Boy and Game Boy Color.

7 hours

1,656 €

Zope

About

Zope is an open source Web server built on top of Python. It is most commonly used for the content management systems Plone and CPS and the enterprise resource planning system ERP5. This course will help you install and operate a Zope server. Zope Win32 binaries and source code can be downloaded at the Zope Web site. From the above page, download the file Zope-x.x.x-x-win32-x86.exe, where "x.x.x-x" is the version of Zope you want, such as 2.7.2-0. When the file is finished downloading, execute it. An installer should begin running. A welcome screen should pop up. Click "Next", and after reading the Zope Public License, click "Next" again. This brings you to a prompt asking you for a Zope site name. You can select any alphanumeric name you wish, although "Zope" is a reasonable default. You will then be asked to confirm the installation directory (by default C:\Program Files\Zope), and select an administrator username and password. For security reasons, it is highly recommended that you change these from the initial settings, as the Zope administration interface can be accessed over the Internet!

7 hours

1,656 €

A First Course to Network Coding

About

Network coding is a rising paradigm for data transportation. It brings light to a prior dark area: that a node within a network can process information passing through it to make better use of the transmission capacity. This is a course aiming to introduce network coding to people with limited background in mathematics and/or engineering. The study of network coding interacts with various fields in engineering, mathematics, physics, even biology.[1] For readers to form a rigorous understanding of network coding, relevent knowledge in mathematics, information theory, engineering etc. is integrated in this course. This chapter gives the audience a general impression of a Shannon-Weaver communication model and a traditional network. This chapter aims to introduce the general idea of network coding via butterfly network, and demonstrate its superiority. This chapter introduces how to measure information, i.e. the concept of entropy and mutual information. This chapter focus on how to measure the performance of a network that implements coding.

7 hours

1,656 €

Elm programming language

About

Elm is a functional programming language for declaratively creating web browser based graphical user interfaces. Elm uses the Functional Reactive Programming style and purely functional graphical layout to build user interface without any destructive updates. The primary implementation of Elm compiles to JavaScript and HTML, with the use of CSS styles. In Elm, Functional Reactive Programming takes the place of event handlers and callbacks; it also manages all screen updates automatically. Purely functional graphical layout takes the place of working with the DOM. Elm also allows Markdown to be embedded directly. Elm adopts a Haskell styled syntax, with influences from OCaml and FSharp. For example, "has type" is written with a single colon (:), and forward and backward function application use the (<|) and (|>) operators[1] where (f x) equals (f <| x) equals (x |> f). Elm has extensible records[2] which safely provide much of the flexibility of Javascript's object model. The type system supports primitive types like integers and floats, structured data like tuples and records, and custom ADT's.[3]

7 hours

1,656 €

Modern C++: The Good Parts

About

Many tutorials for C++ are targeted to C++ as it was standardized in 2003 (C++03) or earlier. Recent progress has produced C++11 and now C++14, and these newer versions have improved the level of simplicity and readability that is feasible for beginners. Many of these improvements supplant older features as the "best way" to solve problems. This course will present problems of increasing complexity, and not explain any given feature until it becomes appropriate for a problem. (See the talk page for a detailed discussion of this.) This course assumes the reader has access to an instructor (or savvy friend), and takes advantage of this for some of the assignments.

7 hours

1,656 €

Ring

About

The Ring is an Innovative and practical general-purpose multi-paradigm scripting language that can be embedded in C/C++ projects, extended using C/C++ code and/or used as standalone language. The supported programming paradigms are Imperative, Procedural, Object-Oriented, Functional, Meta programming, Declarative programming using nested structures, and Natural programming. The language is portable (Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, Android, etc.) and can be used to create Console, GUI, Web, Games and Mobile applications. The language is designed to be Simple, Small, Flexible and Fast. Its Dynamic Language (Dynamic Typing and Weakly Typed) that compile the source code to byte code then execute it by the Ring Virtual Machine, which is integrated with the Ring Compiler in one program. The first version of the language (around 100,000 lines of C/C++/Ring code) is released on January 25th, 2016

7 hours

1,656 €


Is learning Programming Language hard?


In the field of Programming Language learning from a live instructor-led and hand-on training courses would make a big difference as compared with watching a video learning materials. Participants must maintain focus and interact with the trainer for questions and concerns. In Qwikcourse, trainers and participants uses DaDesktop , a cloud desktop environment designed for instructors and students who wish to carry out interactive, hands-on training from distant physical locations.


Is Programming Language a good field?


For now, there are tremendous work opportunities for various IT fields. Most of the courses in Programming Language is a great source of IT learning with hands-on training and experience which could be a great contribution to your portfolio.



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